Your Step-wise Study Abroad Plan 2019-20

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Study Abroad in 2019-2020: A step-wise plan

2019 Jul-Aug-Sep

– Undertake a broad research, both online and offline, regarding the course and the university where you want to study. Narrow down your research and shortlist at least six universities offering your desired course of study.

– Start preparing for IELTS/TOEFL/GRE/SAT/OET/GMAT tests, as required by your shortlisted universities.

2019 Oct-Nov

– Finalise your list of Universities to at least two or three universities. Start applying to them for scholarships.

– Take the required study abroad tests (IELTS/TOEFL/GRE/SAT/OET/GMAT).

– Start to ask for LOR (Letter of Recommendation) from as many sources as possible. Begin to prepare your SOP (Statement of Purpose).

2019-2020 Nov-Dec-Jan

– Collect all the application materials to be sent to your selected universities. Application materials like the university application form, your resume, SOP, LOR, Educational Certificates/Transcripts, Financial documents, et cetera.

– Start applying to your selected Universities.

2020 Feb-Mar-Apr

– By now, you should start to receive offer/admission letters from the universities applied.

– Get the necessary Government forms/certificates where you have applied. For example, if you have applied to U.S. universities, then you should get the Form I-20 from the U.S. universities. The Form I-20 should include the student tracking number (SEVIS ID number) and school code.

– Start preparing for your visa interview.

2020 May-Jun-Jul

– Arrange your finances as required by the universities.

– Apply for a visa. Attend your visa interview.

2020 Aug-Sep

– By this time, your university would have granted you the admission and you would have purchased your air ticket.

– Board your flight to your chosen university in your chosen country.

– Good luck!

NOTE:  R. J. English Academy offers 100% free visa consultancy to its students preparing for study abroad tests.

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The 25 Best Universities of 2019

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According to the Times Higher Education World University Rankings 2019, the best 25 universities of 2019 are as follows:

1. University of Oxford, United Kingdom
2. University of Cambridge, United Kingdom
3. Stanford University, United States
4. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, United States
5. California Institute of Technology, United States
6. Harvard University, United States
7. Princeton University, United States
8. Yale University, United States
9. Imperial College London, United Kingdom
10. University of Chicago, United States
11. ETH Zurich, Switzerland
=12. Johns Hopkins University, United States
=12. University of Pennsylvania, United States
14. UCL, United Kingdom
15. University of California, Berkeley
16. Columbia University, United States
17. University of California, Los Angeles
18. Duke University, United States
19. Cornell University, United States
20. University of Michigan, United States
21. University of Toronto, Canada
22. Tsinghua University, China
23. National University of Singapore, Singapore
24. Carnegie Mellon University, United States
25. Northwestern University, United States

[Source: The Times Higher Education World University Rankings. https://www.timeshighereducation.com/world-university-rankings/2019/world-ranking#survey-answer ]
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Familiarise yourself with the computer-delivered IELTS

Computer-delivered IELTS

Overview:

Immersive Experience:

Introduction:

Features and Functions of the Computer Platform:

Using the Help Button:

Making Notes:

Highlighting Text:

Listening:

Reading:

Writing:

[Sources:
1. https://www.youtube.com/user/BCIELTS
2. https://www.youtube.com/user/IELTSEssentials ]

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Here’s why you got a score of Band 9 in the IELTS Speaking Test

What speaking ability does a score of IELTS Band 9 represent?

Watch this Speaking test sample, where Anuradha from Malaysia talks about ‘Famous people’. Here’s why this performance was given a Band 9:

This test taker speaks fluently, with only rare repetition or self-correction. Any hesitation is not to search for language but to think of ideas. Her speech is coherent, with fully appropriate cohesive features (if you’re talking about; other than that; I think it’s more; as you can see).

She uses vocabulary with full flexibility and precision in all topics with a wide range of idiomatic language (have a tendency; be exposed to; the world is becoming more globalised; the norm; strikes a chord; communication tool; actors that sponsor; materialistically; cool gadgets; grasp of people’s mindset).

Her grammatical structures are precise and accurate at all times. She uses a full and natural range of structures and sentence types and makes no noticeable errors.

She uses a full range of phonological features with precision and subtlety. The rhythm of her language is sustained throughout and stress and intonation are invariably used to good effect. This and her very clear production of individual words and sounds result in her being effortless to understand.

[Source: http://www.youtube.com/IELTSofficial ]

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See also:

Here’s why you got a score of Band 5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 5.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 6 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 8 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 8.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test

Here’s why you got a score of Band 8.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test

What speaking ability does a score of IELTS Band 8.5 represent?

Watch this Speaking test sample, where Kenn from Singapore talks about ‘Famous people’. Here’s why this performance was given a Band 8.5:

This test taker speaks fluently for most of the time and develops topics coherently and appropriately, with only slight content-related hesitations as he engages with the topics.

His vocabulary is precise and sophisticated throughout this part of the test (prominent businessmen; emulate; a growing number of television celebrities; to promote charitable causes; endorsing a cause; negative repercussions; conscious of body image; susceptible to; prevalent).

He uses a wide range of grammatical structures naturally and accurately, with no noticeable error. He also uses a full range of pronunciation features to convey precise and subtle meaning such as emphatic stress (one example that comes to mind is celebrities) and contrastive stress (it’s not necessarily for causes … it’s also for celebrity behaviours). He sustains this flexible use of features of connected speech throughout and is effortless to understand.

[Source: http://www.youtube.com/IELTSofficial ]

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See also:

Here’s why you got a score of Band 5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 5.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 6 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 8 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 9 in the IELTS Speaking Test

Here’s why you got a score of Band 8 in the IELTS Speaking Test

What speaking ability does a score of IELTS Band 8 represent?

Watch this Speaking test sample, where Khush from India talks about ‘Famous people’. Here’s why this performance was given a Band 8:

This test taker speaks fluently and is able to give quite long and detailed responses without any loss of coherence. Hesitation is usually content-related and only occasionally to search for language.

She uses fillers (you know; I mean) to cover this. Linking words and markers are used very naturally (that’s not the case; I’m fine with that).

Her vocabulary resource is wide and it allows her to talk about a range of topics with some flexibility and precision.

There are plenty of examples of stylistically appropriate language (political pressure; into corruption; today’s world; offensive; promote the product; a money-making business) with only occasional inaccuracies (do a meeting; in a right/wrong manner).

She uses a wide range of structures with a high level of accuracy. She makes only occasional minor errors. She uses pronunciation well to reinforce meaning, with rhythm, stress and intonation all used appropriately (at times I do like). There are only occasional lapses in word stress and in the formation of ‘th’.

What speaking ability does a score of IELTS Band 8 represent?

Watch this Speaking test sample, where Kopi from Botswana talks about ‘Famous people’. Here’s why this performance was given a Band 8:

This candidate speaks fluently but rather slowly, with occasional hesitation as he engages with the topics. He is able to give quite complex and detailed responses without any loss of coherence, drawing on a range of markers to introduce his ideas (in that way; in some way; we have a situation in our country; in that regards; in every respect).

He skilfully uses his wide vocabulary in a sophisticated way to express himself precisely and accurately (reaching out through music; I wouldn’t put it past them; significant level; growing trend; a ripple effect), although there are a few inappropriate word forms and choices (old generation instead of ‘older generation’; have a long way instead of ‘have a long way to go’; a step back instead of ‘a backward step’).

He uses a full range of sentence forms and grammatical structures naturally, accurately and appropriately.

The test taker is easy to understand throughout the test, in spite of a slight accent. Occasional misplaced stress and vowel formation (misicians for ‘musicians’; Bread Pitt for Brad Pitt) only minimally affect intelligibility.

[Source: http://www.youtube.com/IELTSofficial ]

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See also:

Here’s why you got a score of Band 5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 5.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 6 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 8.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 9 in the IELTS Speaking Test

Here’s why you got a score of Band 7.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test

What speaking ability does a score of IELTS Band 7.5 represent?

Watch this Speaking test sample, where Aashish from Nepal talks about ‘Work, friends, food and cooking’. Here’s why this performance was given a Band 7.5:

This test taker speaks fluently and he engages with the questions without any obvious effort. There is only occasional hesitation, repetition and self-correction, which is mostly content-related and only rarely to search for language.

His relaxed delivery is supported by his flexible use of markers (I am both; basically; as well as; every now and then; that would be French).

His vocabulary is sufficient for him to engage with a variety of topics and he demonstrates an ability to use idioms and collocations with some sense of style and skill. However, he makes a number of inappropriate vocabulary choices (all over the place; that’s not just my cup of tea; someone to confront and talk to; I haven’t got a chance), which restrict his rating on this criterion.

He has a wide range of grammatical structures at his disposal and the majority of sentences are error-free. Even when errors do very occasionally occur (I work part-time as well as a student; it just does not come into me), they do not detract at all from meaning.

He uses a wide range of pronunciation features and is able to use stress and intonation effectively. There are just a few lapses and very occasionally sounds are poorly formed (bot for ‘both’; vent for ‘went’), but overall, his accent has only minimal effect on intelligibility.

[Source: http://www.youtube.com/IELTSofficial ]

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See also:

Here’s why you got a score of Band 5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 5.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 6 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 7 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 8 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 8.5 in the IELTS Speaking Test
Here’s why you got a score of Band 9 in the IELTS Speaking Test