Leaders prioritize what they want

Once upon a time, a teacher filled a jar with large stones
and asked the students whether the jar was full or not. The
students replied that it was full. Then the teacher added few
pebbles and shook the jar. The pebbles settled in between
the spaces of the large stones. Then the teacher asked
whether now the jar was full or not. The students replied it
was full. Then the teacher added sand and shook the jar. The
sand settled wherever it could find any space. Then the
teacher asked whether now the jar was full or not. The
students replied it was full.

Thereafter, the teacher emptied the jar. Then he put the
sand first inside the jar, which settled at the base of the jar.
He asked the students whether the jar was full or not. The
students replied that the jar was not full, as the sand was only
at the base. Then the teacher added pebbles, which settled
on top of the sand. Again, he asked the students whether the
jar was full or not. The students replied it was not, as there
was still some space left over the pebbles. Then the teacher
added the large stones in the jar. Only one or two stones
could go inside as there was no space left. Then the teacher
asked whether the jar was full or not. The students replied
that the jar was full, but since some large stones could not be
put inside it, so in this sense, the jar was not full.

The teacher said, “The jar represents your life. The large
stones represent your family, your health, etc. The pebbles
represent your career, your job, etc. The sand represents all
the small things that you do in life. Now, if you start filling
the jar with large stones first, it will always remain full. But if
you start filling the jar with sand first, then it will not be
always full. So, one must concentrate on filling the jar first
with the large stones and then the pebbles and then the sand.
One must concentrate first on the family, health, education,
etc., and then the job, career, house, car, etc., and lastly the
other small things of life.”

~0~
Excerpt from the book “Once Upon A Time: 100 Management Stories” by Rajen Jani

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