78. Medea resolves to help Jason

Once upon a time, King Aeetes of Colchis had received the Golden Fleece from Phryxus. Jason, the son of Aeson, along with the Argonauts, approached Aeetes to ask the Golden Fleece. Aeetes agreed to give, provided Jason completed three tasks. Firstly, after taming fierce bulls, Jason had to make them plow the field of Mars. Secondly, he had to sow the teeth of a dragon in that field and lastly, he had to defeat the dragon guarding the Golden Fleece.

While Aeetes was explaining the tasks to Jason, the virgin Medea, daughter of Aeetes, was present near her father’s throne. As soon as she saw Jason, at the very first sight, she fell in love with him. Her love-struck heart frantically began to beat with happiness, but knowing the hard labours that Jason faced, her heart sank into unhappiness. Desire persuaded her to help Jason, but reason persuaded her otherwise.

Later in the day, Medea went to the altar of goddess Hecate to pray. While walking she thought that was her heart made of stone? If not, then why would she deny any help to Jason? Even a heart of flint would be moved by his youth, nobility and handsome countenance. If she did not help, then he would surely die. But, if she helped, then he would marry her. She thought of sailing away with him, forsaking her father, brother, Gods, and her native land. Forsaking would be easy, as her father was strict, her brother was just a child, the Gods were always in her heart, and her native land was rough. If she left, then she would not be leaving behind valued hopes. As Jason’s bride, in his sweet embrace, she would forget all fears and sorrows. But what if he sailed away alone, leaving her behind?

With such mixed thoughts, while Medea proceeded to the altar of Hecate, she met Jason on the way. Holding the hallowed Sun and goddess Hecate as witnesses, Jason promised marriage to Medea. Thus assured of Jason’s love, Medea resolved to help him gain victory in his tasks.

~0~
Excerpt from the book “Once Upon A Time-II: 150 Greek Mythology Stories” by Rajen Jani

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